Tag Archives: disordered eating habits

You Do You

My brother has this saying: “You do you.”  It means don’t worry about what other people are saying about you or to you; you just do whatever is true to you regardless of the outsiders. The last time he said this was in respectful, quasi-disagreement with my views on intuitive nutrition. What I don’t think he realized is he was actually indeed agreeing with me.

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Intuitive eating is rooted in understanding, listening to, and responding to your own body cues–hunger, cravings, fullness, illness, what sounds good, what doesn’t, etc.–without the influence or pressure of external forces (such as diets, family opinions, media, or mainstream science.) Nutrition is just the beginning, though. This principle blossoms into intuitive living as a whole, rooted in understanding, listening to and responding to your body’s cues for rest, crying, movement, celebration, laughter, adventure, meditation, prayer, sleep, etc. without regard to external cultural rules and expectations. You do you. The result of living (and eating) intuitively is thriving in peace with who you are inside the body you have right now.

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You were divinely created by God–your personhood, your heart, your mind, your purpose. He also created your physical body. The same way God speaks to your heart and leads you to/within your purpose on the spiritual level, while also guiding your thoughts on a conscience level, He also designed your body to take care of you on the physical level. Your body was created with all the systems, processes, and communications necessary to keep you thriving physically. Since God created you and you’re the one living inside your body, no one can possibly know your body better than you and God.

Therefore, the external forces that try to convince or control you into thinking your body needs to be different (smaller, lighter, trimmer, tighter, healthier, cleaner, etc.) don’t get to have a say in how you run your body or what your body looks like.

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That’s all well and good, Leanne, but I have ______________ ( fill in the blank–diabetes, sleep apnea, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, etc.) and my doctor–who is a trusted external influence–says I need to lose weight to be healthier and reduce my chances of early death. 

To this I say: medical health conditions are serious and scary; you should absolutely work with your doctor on proper treatment. However, while science says weight is a correlating factor with many health conditions, correlation does not equal causation. Furthermore, there is not one single diet or weight loss program proven to provide safe, long-term, sustainable weight loss. Within one to five years of any restriction-based diet, the weight returns plus more (which is a biological, protective response to nutrient deprivation), along with the mental anguish associated with feelings of failure, shame, and fear.

Weight loss cannot be the focus but rather reconnecting with your body—its cues and communication with you and your unique biology.

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When I went into eating disorder recovery, I was severely underweight for what my body needed, and I was at serious risk of stroke, heart failure, and death. My metabolism was broken, hormonal system out of whack, and digestive system a mess. But gaining weight was never the focus of my recovery to health.  My therapy team focused on teaching me how to reconnect with and understand my body–what my hunger feels like, what my cravings mean and why they are important, what foods I like and don’t like and why. As I got deeper into recovery, I learned what kind of movement (exercise) my body liked as opposed to what I had been forcing it to do; I connected with my  body shape and strength as I meditated and prayed through yoga poses. Most importantly I learned to understand my cues for rest and how to tune out all the cultural messages that say I need to be different.

Eventually my body found its natural set point without ever focusing on “gaining weight.” Your body has a natural set point too, and as you learn to reconnect with yourself and your body cues, your body will find its own healthy place without focusing on “losing weight.”

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 You do you. Learn to connect with your body through your own intuition around nutrition, movement, and living, without external diets/programs and regardless of what folks around you are doing, saying, or expecting. God designed you perfectly and purposefully, so if you trust Him with your life, you can trust Him with your body.

Resources to help you (these are NOT affiliate links):

You don’t have to earn your food

My son and father-in-law came home from skiing yesterday all damp, chilled, and tired. My daughter and her friend just finished baking chocolate chip cookies, so our house was all warm and smelled of freshly baked goodness. My husband handed the plate of cookies to my father-in-law and said, “Hey Dad! Have a cookie. You deserve it.”

“No,” I said. “We don’t earn cookies. Have a cookie because they smell amazing, and you’re probably hungry after a long day of skiing and driving.”

My husband smiled and gave me a soft, knowing chuckle. “Yes. You’re right. Dad, you want a freshly baked cookie? They just came out of the oven.”

My father-in-law partook, of course! As did my hungry son.

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There’s a message in our culture that you have to earn your food, especially foods that are deemed “special,” “guilty pleasures,” or “bad for you.”

And you believe that message. You wait for special occasions to have that “sinful” chocolate cake; you wait until you’ve eaten your grilled chicken salad with balsamic vinaigrette to enjoy the mint chip ice cream in the freezer (but only a bite because you already indulged in a brownie earlier today); you eat the plate of fettuccine Alfredo because you earned it on the hike this afternoon; you reward yourself with dessert this time since you’ve been “so good lately.”

The opposite is also true. You punish yourself when you’ve “been bad” and ate the extra cookie or two or the whole plate. Working out has become both the reward and punishment for how you earn or eat your food– burning off the doughnuts Joe brought into work today (dang you, Joe!); or burning an extra few hundred calories in preps for the family dinner tonight, because mom is making her dutch apple pie, and you know you won’t be able to control yourself to just one slice.

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You don’t have to earn your food. You don’t have to “be good” to enjoy the foods you love, especially the sweet stuff. You also don’t need to punish yourself for eating, enjoying, and even craving certain foods…you know, the foods with all the rules and regulations about sugar, fat and calories.

When you try to earn your food by being good enough to deserve it (whether through restriction or avoidance of fun foods, or burning off calories in exercise) you are defining your value based on food: “I was bad today; I ate the brownie. I need to run two hours to work that off.” OR “I was so good because I didn’t eat the brownie.”  You may think you’re being healthy by controlling yourself through reward and punishment, but what you’re doing on a deeper level is attaching or diminishing your self-value based on your behavior with food. And that, my dear friend, is not healthy. Nor is it kind to you.

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Your body has no rules about food. Your body doesn’t value foods as “good” or “bad”; your body doesn’t define you as good or bad.  Culture does, but your body doesn’t. Listen to your body, sweet friend.

Your body doesn’t judge you if you feed it mint chocolate chip ice cream before or with your chicken salad (or a bacon cheeseburger for that matter); your body loved the doughnuts Joe brought today because that maple bar sounded delicious to your brain, and your body was able to use that energy to get you through the 10:00 meeting; Mom’s dutch apple pie is both delicious and nostalgic because she would make it for your dad when he returned home from long business trips and your family was together again. Dutch apple pie literally makes your heart happy and your body thanks you for feeding it something you enjoy.

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Eat what sounds good, when it sounds good. You don’t deserve it because you don’t have to earn it.  And you don’t have to work it off because you didn’t eat anything wrong.

May you find joy in your food and peace in your body.

Much love!